Monday, June 18, 2018

Into the Woods of Your Mind

What’s in Your Woods?

It is a poorly kept secret that I suffer from Mobility Stuff. (Same initials, I just won’t give it power.) After nine years of good and bad days, I’m getting better. So, I’m doing what I need to do and I’m walking through it.

Lately, I’ve been taking morning walks and I'm amazed to actually see some of what’s living in my woods. One morning, a fox strolled towards me before realizing that he might want to go the other way. The fox looked exactly like they do in a kid’s cartoon, bright red with a “sly” smile.

I saw a giant turkey vulture sitting on a fence. She looked at me as if she belonged there and I did not. And then I “discovered” the barred owls who starred at me as if they’d never seen anything so odd.

I may not have seen them before, but these creatures live here, and they have been here all along.

These encounters with the wildlife in my woods got me to thinking about my own subconscious. I began to wonder about what has been living in the woods of my own mind. What wild thought has taken residence and has birthed a family in my subconscious?

What lives in the woods of my thinking, nesting and belonging without me even noticing?

Maybe, I’ll heal better when I clear out the thoughts that have burrowed a nest in my subconscious and have sent pain down my nerves and into my limbs. 

Maybe, just maybe the woods of our mind are harboring creatures that keep us up at night, keep us from moving forward whispering doubt and disbelief.

The fox, deer, owls, vultures and even the snakes that I know are out in the woods can stay right where they are, but the unknown of my mind had better watch out, because I’m doing a clearing.

I am renewing my mind on a daily basis. I’m getting rid of anything that keeps me from moving forward into the best I can be. 


Be you, be well, be healed.

Bertice Berry, PhD.


Monday, June 11, 2018

Becoming Mature


On Maturity

I am now a woman of a certain age, but I must admit, I don’t really know what that certain age is. I’m 57, feel closer to 47 and can’t wait to be 67. I love getting older, more specifically, I love maturing.

For some reason, folks have been confusing maturity with aging. Getting older doesn’t mean that one becomes more mature. When people speak of mature adults, they usually mean old; but this is not the true meaning.

To be mature means that you have reached an advanced stage of mental and emotional development. Maturity is defined as one who is stable, sensible, responsible, levelheaded, reliable and dependable.

By now you are thinking of all the grown folks you know who are just not grown.

Now, join me in turning this on yourself. Ouch. I can only speak for myself when I say that as hard as I have worked and as much growth that I have seen; there are still several key areas in my life that can use some maturity.

I’ll spare you the details, but I will tell you this; it’s time we evolve, grow and become all that we can truly be.

I don’t want to be a 67-year-old kid. I’d like to be a wise and mature 57-year old vessel of light.

Be you, be well, be evolving.


Bertice Berry, PhD.

Monday, June 4, 2018

Where are the Adults?

Be the Light


“Where are the grown-ups,” my ninth-grade teacher had asked. He had just come back from his uncle’s funeral. He said that he’d been told that he was one of the pallbearers and his first response was “Where are the adults?” It was then that he realized that he and his cousins were not the next in line; they were at the front of the line.

So where are the adults? I have asked this question a lot lately. I’ve asked it of politicians, corporate, community and spiritual leaders; I’ve asked it of my family and I have asked it of myself.
The answer is simple; I am.

We are the adults and we must be capable, fearless and ready to shine a light on our own ills and fears. We must be the repairers of the breach. We must be the adults.

I am starting with me, in my own house and in my own life. Someone once said, “Adulting is hard.” No kidding and we should have listened when we wanted to be grown before it was time.

Now, it’s time and as adults we should recognize the fact that time is time and our own is finite, but the light we carry inside of us goes on and on. The light grows with each good deed and life we encounter.
So, shine your light; it's ageless.

Be you, be well, be the light.


Bertice Berry, PhD.

Tuesday, May 29, 2018

Rebooting

Reboot Now

I think my computer is trying to tell me something. This morning while I was struggling to write a long overdue piece, my computer asked if I wanted to reboot now. “Yes, please.” I told it out loud.

It turned itself off and I decided to go find something else that needed to be done. Before I could warm up my legs to move (yes, I do that now,) my computer screen blinked back to life. It looked totally refreshed.

“I wish it could be that easy for me.” I told the screen.

I didn’t use to talk to things, but I find that my things have great answers, like the other day when my dryer told me to clean my filter before each use---anyway, I wish I could turn myself off for a minute and then come back refreshed and new.

Then I heard her voice, not the one from my computer; the one from the other side. It was the voice of my mother telling me my truth.

“You can, and you should. You've had a job since you were twelve." She reminds me.
"You have always been so busy being busy. When you have to go to work; you work. When you are not at work; you fear not working, so you create work and work at that. Turn all of that off,” she said.

And now you see why I talk to things, because listening to the ancestors is far too accurate for someone who prides herself on being in control.

Just when I gave in to the idea of rebooting, my daughter walked in to tell me about work that needed to be worked, so I looked down at my knees and I told them to come on.

Then, I hear my mother again. This time she’s sitting next to me when she says, “Even iron wears out.”

Be you, be well, be rebooting.


Bertice Berry, PhD.

Monday, April 2, 2018

Stop and See the Love

Stop and See the Love


 My life moves rather fast. If I’m not careful, I could miss all the instances of love that are everywhere waiting for me to just notice.

On Easter Sunday, I went from Savannah, Georgia to Southern Utah.
I could feel bad about not being at my own church on Easter Sunday, but then I’d be denying the power of that evening mass the night before, which left me feeling even more connected to all that is. I’d also miss the power of Love in the beautiful mountains in Utah, complete with caribou sighting. 
Love, like God is everywhere.

I could complain about missing my 2-year-old granddaughter’s Easter egg hunt, where she’d, for the first time, find her own eggs. But if I did, I’d be missing all the love that came from my daughter, who after working late, got up to take her niece to that hunt. She sent pictures and shared wonderful stories of joy and love that was extended to my granddaughter who was a tad slower than the older kids. Those faster kids turned around and emptied their baskets to Alayna. 
Love is everywhere.

I could complain about two flights and a 3-hour car ride, but then I’d have to forget the words of my mother, who was born 100 years ago. To her, all travel was “still faster than the pony express.” She’d marvel at how far I’d gone in the same day.
 Love never leaves; like our ancestors, it’s still with us and is everywhere.

I could be bothered by the fact that I’m not in a big hotel, one that comes with room service; but if I did, there would be something wrong with me. I’m in a beautifully cozy executive suite. The hosts filled my refrigerator with vegan meals and treats that I couldn’t have gotten from any room service menu. 
Love is in this room and it’s everywhere.

I could complain about not being with my family, but then I’d miss the love of the strangers I met on my journey. Love was in the joyful announcement of the flight attendant who told me that they all loved my work. It was in the driver who made sure that I was comfortable and told me that I could have as many stops as I needed.

There was love in the passenger who sat next to me on the flight. He didn’t speak the entire four hours, but when it was time to go, he asked which bag mine was, and lovingly got it down for me.

Stop and see the love. It’s always there, but when you complain, you miss it.

Be you Be Well, Be Loved


Bertice Berry, PhD

Monday, March 26, 2018

Revived

Restored Revived Resurrected


 There are times when even I feel like I am powerless. I sometimes feel like I’m not making a difference and I while I believe, I need help in my unbelief. Sometimes I feel like I’m preaching to a choir that no longer wants to sing.

Then something simple happens to remind me of just how amazing and powerful this journey is.

I got a message from someone who follows someone who follows me. They said that a young exchange student from South Africa wanted to go to church and because I had been posting about my church, they thought I might be able to help.
Say no more. The young woman came to Christ Church Episcopal and she brought a friend, an exchange student from Ukraine. Church was packed, so the young women sat in the balcony with others who made them feel welcomed and loved. (Which is why I’m always posting about these wonderful folks.)

When church was over, we went to lunch and as we sat waiting for our table, I told them about my friend and sister Brynn who has always had an exchange student. Just as I said it, Brynn’s husband walked by. He and Brynn were having lunch there. He shared the magical changes that were happening for them and I was reminded to always believe.

We sat down for lunch and one of the young women asked if I had recently been to Savannah Tech and I told her yes. She laughed with joy and said, “You stopped in my classroom and I told myself that I needed to know you.”

This young woman from Ukraine had been taking an ESL class in the Bertice Berry Change and Transformation classrooms.

We are more powerful than we know. We possess the ability to make a difference in the lives of those we meet.

This Holy week, ask yourself how you can be revived, renewed and resurrected.
Be You, Be Well, Be Resurrected.

Bertice Berry, PhD.

Monday, March 19, 2018

The Long Road

The Long Road

                                                               



Life is a series of roads. We are all moving towards one goal or another. We measure and mark the journey with milestones and makers of completion, but sometimes, we need to take a long look back.

I’ve had to do that a lot lately. It took a crazy flu to make me slow down and take a rest.

When you go through life full-speed, it’s difficult to see what you pass; or what you’ve left behind.
I don’t have regrets, but I know that I’ve missed some things.

So, for three weeks of going nowhere and saying very little, I was forced to look back.

This journey has been beautiful. It’s been fraught with obstacles and detours. I have gotten off track and back on again, but when I slow down and look closely, I can hear the ancestors telling me to “go ‘head.”

I can hear God saying, “You are my beloved, in you I am well pleased.”

And I can hear the children from the future saying I’m so glad that I knew her. I am so glad that she showed me love.

Stay the course Dear Hearts, but take a moment to look back and know that you are marvelous.

Be you Be Well Be Marvelous


Bertice Berry, PhD.